Rosen Could Save Patriots’ Dynasty

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Earlier today, Adam Schefter and Bleacher Report broke a story that current quarterback for the Arizona Cardinals, Josh Rosen, could be on the trade block. The story was reported as this, following the Cardinals hire of new head coach Kliff Kingsbury, Rosen may be moved so Kingsbury can draft Kyler Murray number one overall this spring. Kingsbury is reported to be in love with the talented quarterback prospect out of Oklahoma and desperately wants him. This would be a very surprising as well as an extremely bold move by Kingsbury. The Cardinals selected Rosen with the tenth overall pick just one year ago and while he played a majority of this season, Rosen has yet to even crack his full potential. The Cardinals have already proved their willingness to think outside the box and do what they believe is best for their team. Kingsbury, is just 39 years old with no NFL coaching experience, far from a typical NFL head coaching candidate. The move to hire Kingsbury shocked many and I believe the Cardinals may not be done with out of the box decisions this offseason.

Rosen’s value is hazy at the moment given his mediocre rookie season and reputation for having a bold attitude but he will certainly command at least a first round pick. However, if I were Bill Belichick and the New England Patriots, I would be blowing up the Cardinals’ phone lines in hopes to get a deal done for the young quarterback no matter the price. In Rosen’s rookie season, he totalled 14 games, threw the football for 2,278 yards, 11 touchdowns, 14 interceptions and completed just over 55 percent of his passes. This is without a doubt a case where the stats do not paint the true picture of the player. Arizona was the worst team in football this season and their roster has holes everywhere on the offensive and defensive sides of the ball. Rosen was somewhat doomed from the start as the players around him were never going to make a real impact. In addition to a baren roster, the Cardinals had first year head coach Steve Wilks last season. Wilks had no prior head coaching experience and is a defensive minded coach, this was hardly going to be a good enough situation for any rookie quarterback to develop or succeed in. I easily believe that with the right situation and right coaching, Rosen can develop into an all pro level quarterback.

The true picture of Rosen is this, he is an outstanding prospect who has some of the best footwork, throwing mechanics and balance that a quarterback could possibly have coming out of college. Rosen does not have the strongest arm, but in a Patriots’ offense that is centered around short routes and precision passing, arm strength is far down the list of importance. In addition to an amazing lower half, Rosen shows great pocket awareness as well as an ability to keep his eyes down field while under pressure. Many NFL scouts and coaches have suggested that Rosen’s biggest flaw is the fact that he is too smart for his own good and that it leads to Rosen challenging coaches philosophies and schemes. I could not disagree with this more. I refuse to believe that you can have a quarterback that is “too smart.” This criticism comes from lazy coaches who simply want to tell their players what to do and hear no feedback. Rosen would benefit from a coach who is willing to go in depth and explain certain schemes as well as situations with him and hear his feedback. Coaches like that are in vast supply here in New England. You can not build a winning culture without them. Despite Rosen’s clear upside, he is not ready to play yet and further exposure to NFL level defenses could damage his development and potential. This is why New England should trade for the young quarterback now and let him sit for the next two seasons behind perhaps the greatest of all time, Tom Brady. With the tutelage from a soon to be Hall Of Fame coach and a soon to be Hall Of Fame quarterback, Rosen would develop into something special and I believe there is no price that would be too high to pay in a trade for Rosen.

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